Girls Day

Brugger Girlsday2013
“Girls aren't interested in technology!” According to a study from the Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung (BIBB) (Federal Institute for Vocational Training), there hasn't, in fact, been much progress in traditional gender distribution in vocational education and training. Girls are more likely to work in retail, as nurses or florists. Boys, on the other hand, like to build or fix things, thus dominating the technical and scientific career fields.
To show young women what is available in terms of more technical occupations, a nationwide event called "Girls Day" is held once a year. Brugger GmbH Magnetsysteme in Hardt has participated in this event for many years.

Last Thursday, 4 young girls visited the company and dove into the world of technology. After a brief introduction and a tour of the factory, the girls went to the tool shop where they were allowed to make their own magnetic version of the game "Ludo," a simplified version of Parcheesi. To do so, they had to machine the base plate on the CNC milling machine and engraved it with personal lettering. Then the holes were punched, metal plates inserted, machined and filed down. A great deal of dexterity was required. In addition, the girls were shown how to program a circle on the CNC lathe and then make it. “Girls are totally interested and unbelievably talented!” explained trained toolmaker Michael Fichter. He works in the tool shop and was there to answer the girls' questions and describe to them in detail what the job of tool maker involves. However, on this day, practical experience was the main focus of the event at Brugger GmbH. The girls did not shy away from operating the large machines under supervision. 
It wasn't only the girls who showed enthusiasm for this event, but also the company, which also plans to take part in the event next year. Girls Day is a good opportunity for the company to awaken interest in technology among young women and to disprove the pre-conceptions about "women" and "technology."